Tag Archives: Meditation

Eat Well And Exercise

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This is so true,  when I eat properly and exercise I feel so much better in mind and body.   Even simple exercise such as a walk gives me a natural high and I feel so good about myself for going.   When I am clean eating,  my body feels better and my mind feels clear.

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Tai Chi For Good Health & Wellbeing

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My doctor has recommended Tai Chi as a form of exercise and meditation.  I don’t know much about it so here is a brief overview and beginners video.  I’m trying to convince my partner to give it a go with me, I have a feeling it will be much more fun doing it with someone else rather than doing it alone in front of the TV.  I’m going to do some YouTube classes before I find a local class as I am very uncordinated and don’t want to make an idiot of myself.

T’ai chi ch’uan training involves five elements, taolu (solo hand and weapons routines/forms), neigong & qigong (breathing, movement and awareness exercises and meditation), tuishou (response drills) and sanshou (self defence techniques). While t’ai chi ch’uan is typified by some for its slow movements, many t’ai chi styles (including the three most popular – Yang, Wu, and Chen) – have secondary forms with faster pace. Some traditional schools of t’ai chi teach partner exercises known as tuishou (“pushing hands”), and martial applications of the taolu’s (forms’) postures.

Since the first widespread promotion of t’ai chi ch’uan’s health benefits by Yang Shaohou, Yang Chengfu, Wu Chien-ch’uan, and Sun Lutang in the early 20th century, it has developed a worldwide following among people with little or no interest in martial training, for its benefit to health and health maintenance.  Medical studies of t’ai chi support its effectiveness as an alternative exercise and a form of martial arts therapy.

It is purported that focusing the mind solely on the movements of the form helps to bring about a state of mental calm and clarity.

The study of t’ai chi ch’uan primarily involves three aspects:

Health: An unhealthy or otherwise uncomfortable person may find it difficult to meditate to a state of calmness or to use t’ai chi ch’uan as a martial art. T’ai chi ch’uan’s health training, therefore, concentrates on relieving the physical effects of stress on the body and mind. For those focused on t’ai chi ch’uan’s martial application, good physical fitness is an important step towards effective self-defense.

Meditation: The focus and calmness cultivated by the meditative aspect of t’ai chi ch’uan is seen as necessary in maintaining optimum health (in the sense of relieving stress and maintaining homeostasis) and in application of the form as a soft style martial art.

Martial art: The ability to use t’ai chi ch’uan as a form of self-defense in combat is the test of a student’s understanding of the art. T’ai chi ch’uan is the study of appropriate change in response to outside forces, the study of yielding and “sticking” to an incoming attack rather than attempting to meet it with opposing force. The use of t’ai chi ch’uan as a martial art is quite challenging and requires a great deal of training.

Bipolar & Chronic Pain – Getting a Grip on it.

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For 6 months now I have had chronic eye pain.  It’s really starting to wear me down and affect my mood and my quality of life is suffering.  As each day goes on I can feel myself getting more depressed and a whole lot crankier.  I can’t see a light at the end of the tunnel, it’s going on and on with no end in sight.  Sometimes it is both eyes, sometimes just the left or the right, there is no pattern to it but it is always there nagging at me.

When you have normal moods it’s hard enough to deal with chronic pain day in and day out, so imagine how hard it is when you have mental health issues to deal with too.  It totally messes with your head.  As a person with bipolar and chronic pain I sometimes feel like I am losing the plot so I have been looking into ways to manage pain effectively to make life a little easier on myself and anyone else who may read this.

It’s not easy because the pain is there no matter what I do.  I can’t take endone (Oxycodone) permanently as my doctor will only prescribe them during a really severe flare up, so I ration them and use them only when I am feeling like I am not coping too well.

So what can I do to help myself to alleviate pain?

Painkillers

Take painkillers responsibly according to your doctor or pharmacists guidelines.  When you are in pain it is too easy to take more meds than the recommended dose in order to stop the pain.  Be mindful of how many you have taken and when the next dose is due.

Relax

Relaxation techniques can really help with pain relief by reducing muscle tension.  Sit in a quiet area and breathe deeply, keep your body relaxed and limp.  Play some soothing music or a relaxation CD or App that you can download from either the Apple store or the Google play store.  Don’t know how that will work with my eyes but relaxing has got to be good right.

Distraction

Any activity that occupies your attention can be used for distraction.  This can be anything, watching TV, reading a book or a craft activity.  Doing an activity that you enjoy can help to divert your mind from the pain.

Cold or Heat Packs

Depending on the type of pain and its location cold or heat packs can be used to alleviate pain.  I’m definitely going to try a heat pack across my eyes to try and soothe the area.  I reckon that would be wonderfully relaxing.

If you are in pain like I am, try some of these techniques, one of them may just work.  As I have a very low pain threshold due to fibromyalgia I personally I go for the pain killers first to take the edge off of it and then do the relaxation secondary to the meds.  That works better for me rather than just going straight to the relaxation as I find it really difficult to relax when I am in a lot of pain.

Still riding that roller coaster!